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29 April 2008

Fun game : Discover the legendary Temple of Time

Expert treasure hunter and renown swordmaster, Billy Blade, sets out on an expedition to discover the legendary Temple of Time and steal the mythical Crystal of Ages. When Billy finds the Crystal, something goes terribly wrong and his sidekick Kong the Monkey becomes trapped inside it! To save king, Billy must solve the riddle of the temple and defeat the Guardians of Time.











http://rapidshare.com/files/26252539/bbattot.rar http://rapidshare.com/files/26252566/bbattot.ia.rar

Tennis Gameplay

Perfect Ace Pro Tournament Tennis presents the next evolution of tennis gameplay, offering a pulsating and electrifying tennis simulation environment giving gamers the chance to experience the exaltations and despondency of a professional tennis player. Easy to pick up and play, Perfect Ace provides an easy-to-understand yet challenging-to-master gaming arena. Featuring 32 characters, all with specially digi-masked lifelike faces, to provide the facial expressions and animations of the world's top players. Extremely complex 3-D scanning technologies have been implemented to give the most realistic height, build, race and weight of the world's greatest players. Grab you racket and head for the courts. Form a duo and represent your national team through the Pro Tournament Mode. Face challenging and gripping doubles and singles matches flying the national flag as you go. Or improve your stroke through vigorous practice in the fast-paced arcade mode, perfecting your gameplay for each different surface. Perfect Ace encapsulates real tournament-tennis thrills and is a must for tennis fans and gamers alike.















http://rs3.rapidshare.com/files/1794077/Perfect_Ace_Pro_Tournament_Tennis.rar



Free : Naruto Game Guide

Naruto: Ultimate Ninja (Prima Official Game Guide) 128 Pages | Prima Publishing | ISBN:0761554203 | PDF | 14 MB

The Ultimate Game Guide to the Ultimate Ninja.

Believe it!


·Moves, combos, and Secret Techniques for all 14 playable characters.
·Detailed tutorials and tables reveal all scrolls, certificates, figures, and audio collections. ·Mission mode walkthroughs aid you in your quest to increase your ninja rank.

·Excerpts from the manga and insights into the Naruto storyline make this guide perfect for both gamers and collectors.

Contents:
Basics Ninja Registration and Techniques Stages Scenario Mode Missions Hidden and Unlockable Items




CLICK THE LINK BELOW TO DOWNLOAD :

http://depositfiles.com/en/files/2905352

27 April 2008

Free Download : Game E-magazine ( Germany Ed. )

























Here's PC Games magazine 03/2008 (Germany Edition)

http://rapidshare.com/files/90657239/PC_Games_2008_03.rar




26 April 2008

25 April 2008

Free download : Commandos 3 Guide

Commandos 3: Destination Berlin
208 pages | Prima Publishing | ISBN:0761548076 | PDF | 7Mb

A group of soldiers will becom
e heroes.
·Exhaustive coverage of all three campaigns
·Complete and detailed walkthroughs of every challenging mission
·Tactics for each of the six playable Commandos
·Thorough briefing on every available weapon and item
·Every in-game move detailed—from knocking on walls to placing boobytraps.









http://rapidshare.com/files/106576545/Commandos_3_Destination_Berlin_Prima_Official_Guide.rar


23 April 2008

Free Game : Millenium War Game

Beachhead 2000 If you've seen Saving Private Ryan, you might agree that the first scene in the World War II film stands out from the rest. The scene lasts around 25 minutes, and it's an incredibly visceral, visually graphic re-creation of the D-Day invasion of Normandy. The action takes place from the perspective of the American troops who storm Omaha Beach in armored landing crafts, only to meet with a deadly barrage of mines and enemy fire. WizardWorks, the same publisher that brought you Deer Hunter, tries to capture the intensity of a WWII beach attack in BeachHead 2000, a loose remake of an old Commodore 64 shooter. For a short time, it may prove to be a fairly entertaining diversion. However, BeachHead 2000's limited gameplay won't hold your attention for long. In BeachHead 2000, you're a lone turret gunner defending a stretch of beach that's under siege. You view the beach from a first-person perspective and aim using the mouse. Your turret is equipped with a machine gun, a howitzer cannon, and guided surface-to-air missiles. You also have a handgun to use as a last-ditch defense. At the beginning of each level, you're given a limited amount of ammo for each gun. Much of the strategy of the game comes from deciding when and where to employ this precious supply of ammo. Fortunately, supply aircraft make frequent parachuted drops of ammo and health. But to obtain these, you've got to shoot the drop-package itself. Attempting to nail these drop-offs with anything but a machine gun poses a considerable - and at times frustrating - challenge. Even if you get the extra ammo, you may still come up a few missiles or rounds short, which can make completing the level nearly impossible. BeachHead 2000's graphics are OK sometimes, but pretty rough in certain respects. The enemy choppers, APCs, landing craft, tanks, and bombers are rendered in 3D with real-time lighting effects - and they actually look decent. The problem is that many of the units pop up out of nowhere, almost as if the game were rendering them late. The infantry troops don't look nearly as good: The foot soldiers look acceptable, but only from far away as they file out of the armored landing crafts. As they draw closer, their choppy animation and 2D photo-scanned faces look silly. BeachHead 2000's gameplay is fast-paced and straightforward. It plays similarly to old arcade shooters like Operation Wolf and Terminator 2, only the screen doesn't ever scroll in any direction. The levels steadily increase in difficulty until it seems as if they won't get any harder. After that, you just continue on and rack up as many points as you can by gunning down the enemy. You can't actually win. The game grows old quickly, as taking out the stream of enemies in each level becomes repetitive. Even the enemy units themselves soon become predictable, as the ground and air units seem to repeat the same maneuvers over and over again. Also, although your inability to move makes sense in the context of the game, it makes the game much less engaging. BeachHead 2000 isn't horrible, though it's not ambitious at all. It has moments that can be satisfying, and the gameplay is quick and easy to learn. If you're a casual game player looking to let off a little steam in a WWII environment, you might enjoy BeachHead 2000 for a little while. But the game isn't suitable for anyone else. Beachhead 2002 Your job is to defend an assigned inland defense perimeter, protecting a command post to repel expected ground and airborne assaults. Attacks come from airlifted troops, armored personnel carriers, tanks, Cobra helicopters, jets, and more. Battle through both day and night scenarios utilizing the limited ammo given you to survive! Beach Head 2002 features: Day and Night Fighting with search lights and flares Realistic physics and motions Special forces night attacks! Smart troops and realistic soldier action (with sophisticated soldier animations) Air support (B58 bombers at your command) Blue-print precise realistic defender weapons (M60 general purpose MG, twin barrel 30 cal AA gun, 75mm AT cannon, .45 handgun, and Gattling gun). Blue-print precise realistic enemy weapons (MB78 main battle tank, APC Fuchs with gun turrets and missile launchers, Cobra attack helicopters, CH53 Shercoskys, F101 jet fighters and C-130 Hercules transport aircraft). Realistic battle sounds and special effects (Dimensional sound effects for distance and battlefield depth. If you've seen Saving Private Ryan, you might agree that the first scene in the World War II film stands out from the rest. The scene lasts around 25 minutes, and it's an incredibly visceral, visually graphic re-creation of the D-Day invasion of Normandy. The action takes place from the perspective of the American troops who storm Omaha Beach in armored landing crafts, only to meet with a deadly barrage of mines and enemy fire. WizardWorks, the same publisher that brought you Deer Hunter, tries to capture the intensity of a WWII beach attack in BeachHead 2000, a loose remake of an old Commodore 64 shooter. For a short time, it may prove to be a fairly entertaining diversion. However, BeachHead 2000's limited gameplay won't hold your attention for long. In BeachHead 2000, you're a lone turret gunner defending a stretch of beach that's under siege. You view the beach from a first-person perspective and aim using the mouse. Your turret is equipped with a machine gun, a howitzer cannon, and guided surface-to-air missiles. You also have a handgun to use as a last-ditch defense. At the beginning of each level, you're given a limited amount of ammo for each gun. Much of the strategy of the game comes from deciding when and where to employ this precious supply of ammo. Fortunately, supply aircraft make frequent parachuted drops of ammo and health. But to obtain these, you've got to shoot the drop-package itself. Attempting to nail these drop-offs with anything but a machine gun poses a considerable - and at times frustrating - challenge. Even if you get the extra ammo, you may still come up a few missiles or rounds short, which can make completing the level nearly impossible. BeachHead 2000's graphics are OK sometimes, but pretty rough in certain respects. The enemy choppers, APCs, landing craft, tanks, and bombers are rendered in 3D with real-time lighting effects - and they actually look decent. The problem is that many of the units pop up out of nowhere, almost as if the game were rendering them late. The infantry troops don't look nearly as good: The foot soldiers look acceptable, but only from far away as they file out of the armored landing crafts. As they draw closer, their choppy animation and 2D photo-scanned faces look silly. BeachHead 2000's gameplay is fast-paced and straightforward. It plays similarly to old arcade shooters like Operation Wolf and Terminator 2, only the screen doesn't ever scroll in any direction. The levels steadily increase in difficulty until it seems as if they won't get any harder. After that, you just continue on and rack up as many points as you can by gunning down the enemy. You can't actually win. The game grows old quickly, as taking out the stream of enemies in each level becomes repetitive. Even the enemy units themselves soon become predictable, as the ground and air units seem to repeat the same maneuvers over and over again. Also, although your inability to move makes sense in the context of the game, it makes the game much less engaging. BeachHead 2000 isn't horrible, though it's not ambitious at all. It has moments that can be satisfying, and the gameplay is quick and easy to learn. If you're a casual game player looking to let off a little steam in a WWII environment, you might enjoy BeachHead 2000 for a little while. But the game isn't suitable for anyone else.




Beachhead 2002

Your job is to defend an assigned inland defense perimeter, protecting a command post to repel expected ground and airborne assaults. Attacks come from airlifted troops, armored personnel carriers, tanks, Cobra helicopters, jets, and more. Battle through both day and night scenarios utilizing the limited ammo given you to survive!

Beach Head 2002 features:

Day and Night Fighting with search lights and flares
Realistic physics and motions Special forces night attacks! Smart troops and realistic soldier action (with sophisticated soldier animations) Air support (B58 bombers at your command) Blue-print precise realistic defender weapons (M60 general purpose MG, twin barrel 30 cal AA gun, 75mm AT cannon, .45 handgun, and Gattling gun). Blue-print precise realistic enemy weapons (MB78 main battle tank, APC Fuchs with gun turrets and missile launchers, Cobra attack helicopters, CH53 Shercoskys, F101 jet fighters and C-130 Hercules transport aircraft). Realistic battle sounds and special effects (Dimensional sound effects for distance and battlefield depth.

















http://www.megaupload.com/?d=JMQR8RKE

20 April 2008






















Just for intermezzo, love is blind, isn't it?

GAME CHARACTER : MATCH ?

Here's the Street Fighter game's character compared with TV and Movie stars.











Kristin Kreuk as Chun-Li











Taboo as Vega











Michael Clarke Duncan as Balrog











Neal McDonough as M. Bison











Chris Klein as Charlie Nash





... thanx to "Poopsies" for the images ...

Free Game : Unique retro-virtual game !

Introversion Software brings another uniquely retro-virtual experience to the PC with Darwinia. If you follow obscure basement-budget PC games, you're probably familiar with Introversion's first title, Uplink: Hacker Elite, a computer-hacking game released in 2001. Uplink developed a bit of a cult following and provided the guys at Introversion with the funds to develop Darwinia, which maintains the same low-fi, indie feel that makes these kinds of games so endearing. Darwinia is a deceptively simple, poignant real-time strategy game wrapped in an abstract, minimalist veneer that somehow manages to make perfect sense within the context of the game. It's a brilliant and addictive experience that's unlike anything you've played before. The first thing you'll notice about Darwinia is the odd art design. The game features a mix of 2D and 3D characters moving about a fully 3D environment. There are no textures in the game, and everything has a sharp, geometric look to it. The vector graphics fit perfectly here though, since the game takes place in a virtual theme park populated by digital inhabitants. Even though everything is flat and undetailed, Introversion manages to pull off some pretty nice effects. For example, when you blow up some of the larger enemies, they'll flake apart into hundreds of small, paper-thin triangles that float away into nothingness. Another nice touch is the digital spirits that are left behind when a creature dies. These spirits are represented by tiny, colored, semitransparent squares that slowly float into the sky and fade away. It's oddly entrancing to watch a cloud of spirits rise almost indiscernibly skyward after a battle. The game is full of these ethereal moments, and it's easy to lose yourself in the landscape. Once you get past the initial novelty of the art design, you'll find that the world of Darwinia has a pretty interesting story behind it. The world of Darwinia is a virtual theme park, created by computer engineer Dr. Sepulveda. The world is inhabited by virtual life-forms known as Darwinians. These little green lemming-like creatures have lived peacefully for thousands of generations, but now a deadly virus has infected the world of Darwinia. It's up to you to eliminate all signs of infection and save the Darwinians from extinction. You'll learn everything there is to know about Darwinia from Dr. Sepulveda himself; he'll occasionally transmit helpful messages to let you know what you need to do to clear each level. He also provides a bit of context at the beginning of each level by explaining the purpose of the mission and why it's essential to the survival of the Darwinians. The story seems minimal, but it's presented clearly; and somehow, it does a great job of making you feel a certain fondness for the tiny green blips that are the Darwinians. The gameplay is solid here as well, and it offers a good mix of strategy, action, and even a bit of puzzle-solving. You can't directly control the Darwinians, but you can create different programs that you can use to fight enemies, collect spirits, or herd and transport Darwinians. By holding the Alt key, you'll bring up the task manager, which is the simple menu system that you can use to create and modify units and check the level objectives. To create a program, you simply draw a gesture with the mouse. For example, to create a squad, which you need for fighting enemies, you have to draw a triangle. The controls do take a bit of getting used to, but it's worth it to leave the play screen free of the usual clutter of RTS games. In the beginning, the task manager can only hold up to three programs at a time; but as you progress, you can ask Dr. Sepulveda to improve it to hold more programs. So, rather than being limited by resources, you're limited by space. If one of your programs is terminated, you can simply draw a quick gesture to spawn a new one. There are only a handful of different programs in the game, but each one plays an integral part in the game. Also, the lack of variety adds to the challenge, because you have to figure out how to best use each program to complete your objectives. You can't simply amass resources for an hour and then send a massive army out to crush everything in its path. This type of strategy is a bit more methodical. Make no mistake, though--there's plenty of combat in Darwinia. You fight with squads, which are small groups of fighters who fire lasers, toss grenades, and shoot rockets. Enemies include all kinds of wispy little virii, spiders, huge centipedes, and floating egg-laying creatures. Eliminating these things is pretty straightforward: You move your squad within range and hold the right mouse button to start firing. There are no target locks in Darwinia--you simply aim with the mouse. It sounds easy, but some of the enemies can get pretty challenging, especially when they start swarming by the hundreds, all the while laying eggs to keep their numbers up. Some of the level objectives require you to herd Darwinians to specific points on the map to get them out of harm's way or to operate various kinds of machinery. This is accomplished with a Lemmings-style checkpoint system, in which you elect one Darwinian to be an officer. You can select a point on a map, and any Darwinian that comes close to the officer will automatically move to that point. The mix of combat and puzzle-solving is quick and challenging at first, but later in the game, as the missions get more complex, the pace does slow down significantly. Some of the objectives in later levels can take well over an hour to complete. Most of this stems from the fact that the environments are quite large, and all the creatures move slowly. It's not too bad, though, and if you're used to complex RTS games, you won't have a problem here. The music and sound effects in Darwinia fit the theme perfectly. The soundtrack runs the gamut from catchy 8-bit tunes to subdued piano arrangements, and each song cues at just the right time. The only disappointment is that the music is only present during the intros. For the most part, there's no music to be heard while you're playing the game. It's not all quiet, though; you'll hear plenty of battle noises as lasers fly and grenades explode. You'll also hear tiny squeals from dying creatures, which is about the only discernible emotive response you'll get from any of the creatures in the game. From the unique visual style to the simple but intelligent gameplay, Darwinia will have you hooked. You can blow through the game in eight or 10 hours, but you'll want to linger a bit longer just to see what else there is to do in this virtual world. If you think you've seen everything, give Darwinia a try; at the very least, it's a nice change of pace.








http://rapidshare.com/files/37202686/twdarwinia.rar

18 April 2008

Free Download : Classic Horror game !

In 1834, in the small New England fishing village of Illsmouth, the distinguished British scientist Lord Boleskine lost his mind. After studying ancient manuscripts of evil repute, he had travelled to this place to observe the passing of Halley's comet. What he observed that night, however, turned him into a raving lunatic. Now, 76 years later, Halley's comet is coming back, and young astronomer John T. Parker has travelled to Illsmouth to try to uncover the truth in Boleskine's wild claims, and see the comet for himself. Shadow Of The Comet is a unique horror adventure, inspired by the terrifying writings of H.P. Lovecraft.





























http://rapidshare.com/files/16728297/shadow_of_the_comet_cd.zip

Free Download : Game E-magazine

Electronic Gaming Monthly, May 2008 PDF | English | 18.9 MB




content :

SOCOM: Confrontation
Sony reloads its a
ddictive multiplayer shooter for the PS3. 50 Cent II Vitamin Water-loving rapper battles terrorists on the PS3 and 360. Sonic Chronicles: The Dark Brotherhood Sonic roleplays the DS. Burnout: Paradise An 8-question pileup for the producer of EA's crash-heavy car game. Mario Kart Wii Test-driving Nintendo's rad racer.









http://depositfiles.com/en/files/4650590

Free Download : Naruto !


NARUTO-TRIBUTE -


Life's just a big game !

14 April 2008

Free Game : Zeus Complete Pack !

As with others games in the series, the player must build a city in an empty plot of land of variable size and resources. The percentage objectives were replaced by direct goals - treasury, trade profit, production, slaying a monster or conquering a rival city among others. Food resources in this game are urchins, fish, pork, cheese, carrots, onions and wheat. Raw Materials include wood (for triremes and monument building), bronze (armor and sculptures), marble (monument building), grapes (wine), olives (olive oil) and fleece (which can be directly sold to citizens). For the first time, it became possible to coin currency - if a silver mine is available, the player can build a mint and have a limited yearly output of currency. Another new feature is how goods are distributed. A large plaza-like road named agora is built on a road, and goods stands are placed on top of it. After the first goods are available (as the owners of each shop pick them from the nearest supply), a peddler will start roaming around in the roads distributing available (and required) goods. Other services must be provided to the city - culture require colleges to train philosophers, gymnasiums for athletes and drama schools for actors, which in turn go (respectively) to podiums, stadiums and theatres to entertain the city. Every four years the Olympic Games are held, the chances of victory being changed from the number of facilities, and by the help of Apollo. Additional services are provided by water bearers from a fountain, healers from an infirmary, watchmen and superintendents. Tax collectors levy a charge based on how well evolved a house is. Religion plays a larger part than in previous games, as Gods or their monsters can protect or attack the player's City. Heroes can be called to slay those monsters or to complete a quest abroad, given the player is able to build their homes (some require culture access, other high desirability, others a wall surrounding the house) and call for them (which require a modest to large amount of goods). If the player builds a large temple any of the Twelve Olympians (Zeus, Poseidon, Hades, Demeter, Athena, Artemis, Apollo, Ares, Hephaestus, Aphrodite, Hermes and Dionysus, in order of importance) - Hestia is not included, and Hera was featured only in the expansion) they can be seen wandering the city occasionally blessing buildings. If the city is invaded, Zeus, Poseidon (by the Kraken) Hades (by the Cerberus), Athena, Artemis (by an unit of Amazons), Ares (himself and by his pet -as he treat him as such- dragon and a unit of Sparti) help defend the city, giving a clear edge over the invaders. If the city is at issues with a god which attacks the city, and the city has a sanctuary to a god of a higher importance, he or she will defend the city (except Aphrodite, which defends against Ares, Hephaestus, Hermes and Dionysus). Monsters can be slain by the according hero, by Apollo or by a large army.

















Code:
http://rapidshare.com/files/30926035/z_p--.part01.rar
http://rapidshare.com/files/30947137/z_p--.part02.rar
http://rapidshare.com/files/30967628/z_p--.part03.rar
http://rapidshare.com/files/30984199/z_p--.part04.rar
http://rapidshare.com/files/31188432/z_p--.part05.rar
http://rapidshare.com/files/31198179/z_p--.part06.rar
http://rapidshare.com/files/31204161/z_p--.part07.rar
Password: djblaster

Games creator !

















Emmy Toyonaga of Electronic Arts in Redwood Shores works on a character for "MySims"

11 April 2008

Aliens Versus Predator 2 - Primal Hunt : Free PC Game

Primal Hunt, the first expansion pack for last year's excellent Aliens Versus Predator 2, will take you around six hours to finish. But it's hard to fault Primal Hunt for its length. For better or worse, 20 bucks for every six hours of gameplay is about average for a modern shooter. However, the expansion doesn't manage to squeeze any memorable settings, set pieces, story elements, or surprises of any kind into those six hours. The single-player campaign is frustrating and boring in equal measures, and nothing really noteworthy has been added to the multiplayer game, so you can feel free to hold all that against it.

As in the original, the expansion features separate human, alien, and predator campaigns (three levels for each) that all intersect at certain points. Primal Hunt feels like a retread of segments from Aliens Versus Predator 2, but without that game's novelty, great pacing, or skillfully executed action sequences. On top of that, while the new developers at Third Law have copied Monolith's design, they haven't done it closely enough, and they generally screw up the parts that worked in the original.

For example: In both Aliens Versus Predator 2 and Primal Hunt, the first alien mission involves scurrying through the level as a face hugger attempting to find a suitable host. The original made this into a sort of interactive cutscene with a clear but cleverly camouflaged path through it. Primal Hunt, on the other hand, attempts to turn it into more of an action sequence with dismal results. In the original, you had to avoid humans, whose overheard conversations not only added some color to the mission but also gave you an indication of what they were likely to do, so you could plan when to move and when to stay hidden. In Primal Hunt, you're avoiding predators, who communicate using uninteresting and indecipherably monotonous shrieks. The level consists of avoiding the apparently arbitrary movements of these predators while searching for the often disguised cracks and vents that will lead you to the next section of the ship. The humans in the original were all either unreachable or in tight groups, making them clearly unsuitable targets for face-hugging. In Primal Hunt, it's entirely possible for a solitary predator to get separated from its pack, at which point you can pounce on it and attach yourself to its head. But unless it's the single correct target at the end of the level, you'll simply die, even though, by all appearances, you've successfully face-hugged a victim. There's one rigidly enforced path through the level, but the design is so sloppy that it becomes a save-and-reload drill as you try to figure out exactly what the developers want you to do.

For the human marine campaign, Primal Hunt eliminates the creeping dread of the best parts of the original and instead focuses on an extended running battle. Rather than setting up some cunning action sequences, the game primarily relies on one trick used over and over again--dropping aliens either right on top of your head or right behind you. This is especially frustrating both because the humans are so fragile and because their weapons are primarily useful at medium to long range. Your survival ultimately hinges on saving and reloading enough to memorize where the aliens are coming from at any point, turning the entire human campaign into a grim, futuristic homework assignment. Conversely, the predator's levels are the most consistently entertaining in the game, though not because any one thing stands out as surprisingly good, but simply because nothing in them is especially bad.

The graphics and sound are all about the same as in the original. Most of the environments, in fact, appear to be taken almost directly from Aliens Versus Predator 2. Three new monsters have been added, though they all look too goofy and cartoonlike for their surroundings. As sort of an acknowledgement of their weakness, two of them are really utilized only once or twice. The third--a big worm that, in a really annoying reversal of the developer's alien strategy, arbitrarily pops up from directly beneath your feet--is used too often.

Four completely undistinguished multiplayer maps are included in the expansion. No new game types have been created, and none of the four maps can be used in the overrun or evac modes. The humans get a new short-range 360-degree motion detector, a double pistol, and mountable turrets, the predators get an unexciting fléchette gun and a really underpowered suicide detonation attack, and the predaliens can now bite heads. None of these subtle changes will make an impression on anyone but the most hard-core Aliens Versus Predator players.

Improbably, Primal Hunt suffers from copying the original both too much and not enough. The original Aliens Versus Predator 2 was a much better game, and you'd be better off going back and playing it again instead.




http://www.megaupload.com/?d=WL6ZHNR2



10 April 2008

Free : Forgotten Riddles - The Mayan Princess game

Forgotten Riddles: The Mayan Princess game - As the Chief Archaeologist, and most experienced in Mayan culture, the Embassy has sent you to investigate the mysterious demise of the last known royal Mayan family. The royal family supposedly died in 1536, yet artifacts left by the Mayan princess have been uncovered dating back to 1556 - twenty years after her supposed death! Your mission is to solve the riddles surrounding the artifacts to uncover what really happened to the Mayan royal family!














http://rapidshare.com/files/59307493/AAAA.rar